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Lunar Meteorite

Miller Range 090034, 090070, & 090075
(paired stones)

Antarctica

 



Three views of MIL 090034 

(photo credit: NASA)

 

MIL 090070 and MIL 090075

(photo credit: Randy Korotev)

 

Three small chips of MIL 090034 in the lab. Click on image for enlargement.

(photo credit: Randy Korotev)

 


Chips of MIL 090070 (top) and MIL 090075 (bottom) in the lab. Millimeter ticks for scale.
Click on image for enlargement (big).

(photo credit: Randy Korotev)

 

Classification from Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter, Vol. 33, No. 2, 2010

MIL 090034

Newsletter: 33,2
Location: Miller Range
Field Number: 20315
Dimensions: 9.0 x 5.0 x 4.5
Mass: 195.56 g

Lunar-Anorth. Breccia

Macroscopic Description: Roger Harrington: 35% of the exterior of this sample is covered with a dull olive green fusion crust. The remaining 65% is broken surface which consists of gray to olive green fine-grained matrix with fine cracks throughout. Features visible in the matrix include four white clasts that range in size from 2-5 mm, several 1-2 mm white clasts, and two 15-20 mm orangish-tan areas. The interior of this sample consists of a gray, fine-grained matrix with 1-2 mm white clasts throughout.

Thin Section (,2) Description: Cari Corrigan, Tim McCoy and Linda Welzenbach. The section consists of an extremely fine-grained matrix with isolated, large (up to mm-sized) mineral grains and fine- to coarse-grained anorthosite and basaltic clasts in all size ranges up to 3 mm. Microprobe analyses reveal olivine of Fa36-43, pyroxene in a wide range of compositions from pigeonite Fs23-41Wo4-6 with intermediate and more FeO-rich compositions, and plagioclase of An97. The Fe/Mn ratio of the pyroxene averages ~58. The meteorite is a basalt-bearing anorthositic regolith breccia.

 

Classification from Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter, Vol. 33, No. 2, 2010

MIL 090070; MIL 090075

Newsletter: 33,2
Location: Miller Range
Field Number: 20890
Dimensions (cm): 7.0 x 5.5 x 3.5; 137.461; 143.523
Mass: 137.461; 143.523 g

Lunar-Anorth. Breccia

Macroscopic Description: Roger Harrington. 40% of the exterior of this sample is covered with a shiny olive green fusion crust. The remaining 60% is broken surface which consists of dark green to gray fine-grained matrix with elongate and equant pale green clasts that range in size from 2-7 mm. White clasts ranging in size from 1-2 mm are present within the pale green clasts. Some evaporite material is encrusted on the broken surface. The interior of this sample consists of a dark green, fine-grained matrix with 3-5 mm gray clasts throughout.

Thin Section (,2) Description: Cari Corrigan, Tim McCoy and Linda Welzenbach. The sections consist of an extremely fine-grained matrix with isolated mineral grains and fine- to coarse-grained basaltic clasts in all size ranges up to 2 mm. Microprobe analyses reveal olivine of Fa37-42, pyroxene in a wide range of compositions from pigeonite Fs20-43Wo6-19 to augite of Fs9Wo43 with intermediate and more FeO-rich compositions, and plagioclase of An89-98. The Fe/Mn ratio of the pyroxene averages ~59. These meteorites were found 10 cm apart in the field and are similar enough that only one description is necessary. They are likely paired. The meteorite(s) is/are a basalt-bearing anorthositic regolith breccia.

 

Randy Says…

Together, these stones are unique and enigmatic. MIL 090070 & 090075 are definitely paired with each other. MIL 090034 is different in several ways but there are also some similarities.

 

More Information

Meteoritical Bulletin Database

MIL 090034 | 090070 | 090075

Map

 

ANSMET Location Map

 

References

Bouvier A., Romaniello S. J., Wadhwa M., Korotev R. L., and Hartmann W. K. (2013) Pb-Pb dating of Apollo 67016 and MIL 090034 lunar impact breccias (abstract). 76th Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society, abstract no. 5312.

Calzada-Diaz A., Joy K. H., Crawford I. A., Spratt J. and Strekopytov S. (2015) Geochemical analysis and possible launch sites of lunar breccias Miller Range 090036 and Miller Range 090070. 46th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, abstract no. 1585.

Korotev R. L. and Zeigler R. A. (2014) Chapter 6. ANSMET Meteorites from the Moon, Thirty-five Seasons of U.S. Antarctic Meteorites (1976–2010): A Pictorial Guide to the Collection (editors K. Righter, R.P. Harvey, C.M. Corrigan, and T.J. McCoy), 101–130, Special Publications 68, American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C., 296 pages, ISBN: 978-1-118-79832-4.

Korotev R. L., Jolliff B. L., and Carpenter P. K. (2011) Miller Range feldspathic lunar meteorites (abstract). In Lunar and Planetary Science XLII, abstract no. 1999.

Liu Y., Patchen A., and Taylor L. A. (2011) Lunar highland breccias MIL 090034/36/70/75: A significant KREEP component (abstract). In Lunar and Planetary Science XLII, abstract no. 1261, Lunar and Planetary Institute.

Martin D. J. P. and Joy K. H. (2014) Lunar meteorites Miller Range 090034, 090070 and 090075: Composition and pairing (abstract). 77th Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society, abstract no. 5191.

Martin D. J. P., Joy K. H., Pernet-Fisher J. F., Wogelius R., Morlok A., and Hiesinger H. (2016) Using quantitative micro-FTIR spectroscopy to characterise the shock history of feldspathic lunar meteorites Miller Range 090034, 090070 and 090075. 47th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, abstract no. 1547.

Martin D. J. P., Joy K. H., Pernet-Fisher J. F., Joy K. H., Wogelius R., Morlok A., and Hiesinger H. (2017) Investigating the shock histories of lunar meteorites Miller Range 090034, 090070, and 090075 using petrography, geochemistry, and micro-FTIR spectroscopy. Meteoritics & Planetary Science 52, 1103-1124.

Miao B., Chen H., Xia Z., Xie L., and Yao J. (2013) The type, occurrence and origin of symplectites in lunar meteorites (abstract). 76th Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society, abstract no. 5234.

Nishiizumi K. and Caffee M. W. (2013) Relationships among six lunar meteorites from Miller Range, Antarctica based on cosmogenic radionuclides (abstract). In 44th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, abstract no. 2715.

Nyquist L. E., Shirai N., Yamaguchi A., Shih C.-Y., Park J. and Ebihara M. (2016) Feldspathic meteorites Miller Range 090034 and 090070: Late additions to the lunar crust. 47th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, abstract no. 1521.

Park J., Nyquist L. E., Shih C.-Y., Herzog G. F., and Yamaguchi A., Shirai N., Ebihara M., Lindsay F.N., Delaney J., Turrin B., and Swisher III C. (2013) Late bombardment of the lunar highlands recorded in MIL 090034, MIL 090036 and MIL 090070 lunar meteorites (abstract). In 44th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, abstract no. 2576.

Shirai N., Ebihara M., Sekimoto S., Yamaguchi A., Nyquist L., Shih C.-Y., Park J., and Nagao K. (2012) Geochemistry of lunar highland meteorites MIL 090034, 090036 and 090070 (abstract). In Lunar and Planetary Science XLIII, abstract no. 2003, 43rd Lunar and Planetary Science Conference.

Zeigler R. A., Korotev R. L., and Jolliff B. L. (2012) Pairing relationships among feldspathic lunar meteorites from Miller Range, Antarctica (abstract). In Lunar and Planetary Science XLIII, abstract no. 2377, 43rd Lunar and Planetary Science Conference.

 

 

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Prepared by
: Randy L. Korotev
 
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
Washington University in St. Louis

Please don't contact me about the meteorite you think you've found until you read this and this.


e-mail
korotev@wustl.edu

Last revised: 13-June-2016