E&PS_WU_logo.jpg

 

Lunar Meteorite

Northwest Africa 12592

Algeria

 

from The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 108

Northwest Africa 12592

Algeria
Purchased: 2017
Mass: 1420 g

Lunar (fragmental breccia)

History: A single weathered stone lacking a fusion crust was found by nomads in Algeria and purchased by Dustin Dickens in Nouakchott, Mauritania in 2017 from an anonymous meteorite dealer.

Physical characteristics: Dark grey sandblasted exterior, with many irregular shaped fragments set in a fine grained vesiculated groundmass. No fusion crust.

Petrography: (T. S. Hayden, M. Anand, OU) The meteorite is a clast-rich fragmental breccia containing numerous mineral and lithic fragments embedded in a fine-grained vesiculated (regolith) matrix. The lithic clast population consists primarily of basaltic clasts, dominated by Ca-rich pyroxene and plagioclase, with minor olivine components. The size range of the lithic clasts is 0.19-1.9 mm. Mineral clasts are mainly pyroxene, olivine, plagioclase, chromite, troilite and Fe-Ni phases. Some impact melt textures present also.

Mineral composition and Geochemistry: (T. S. Hayden, M. Anand, OU) Feldspar (An95.2±0.7Ab4.7±0.7, N = 31), Pigeonite (Fs43±3.3Wo9.5±4.4, Fe/Mn=65.5±3.3, N=45), Augite (Fs25±4.8Wo35.7±6.1, Fe/Mn=59.5±5.6, N=54), Clinoferrosilite (Fs48.6Wo5, Fe/Mn = 67.4, N=1), Clinoenstatite (Fs44.5±4.3Wo4.4, Fe/Mn = 64.7±3.9, N=11), Olivine (Fa47.6±16, Fe/Mn=104.5±10.8, N=33). O isotopes (measured at OU): Repetition 1: δ17O = 3.266‰, δ18O = 6.333‰, Δ17O=-0.052 (linearized using a slope of 0.5247), Repetition 2: δ17O = 3.217‰, δ18O = 6.174‰, Δ17O=-0.018‰ (linearized using a slope of 0.5247. Mean: δ17O = 3.242 ± 0.035‰ (1-sigma), δ18O = 6.254 ± 0.112‰ (1-sigma), Δ17O=-0.035±0.024 (1 sigma).

Classification: Lunar fragmental regolith breccia.

Specimens: Specimen: 20 g specimen held at OU. Dustin Dickens holds the main mass.

 

Randy Says…

I have not studied this one.

 

More Information

Meteoritical Bulletin Database

NWA 12592

 

References

 

 

Back to: Lunar Meteorites | List of Lunar Meteorites | Top of Page

 

 

Prepared by: Randy L. Korotev

Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
Washington University in St. Louis

Please don’t contact me about the meteorite you think that
you’ve found until you read this and this.

 

e-mailkorotev@wustl.edu

Last revised: 16 May 2019