Why this rock is probably not a meteorite:

It's too red?
 
What is it?

We're looking at two sides of the same stone. The fabric squares in the background are about 5-6 mm on a side. Click on either image for enlargement.

This one is, in fact, a meteorite, one of the many Millbillillie (eucrite) stones from Australia. The bottom photo shows the fusion crust with some flow lines. The top photo shows a broken face. The stone is heavily stained with hematite-rich soil from the desert in which it was found. But notice the gray interior where the stone has been chipped along the bottom edge of the top photo.

Meteorites may be reddish on the outside, but they are never this red on the inside.

Thanks to Karl for loan of the meteorite.

  


&
www.catchafallingstar.com
www.catchafallingstar.com


Prepared by:

Randy L. Korotev


Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
Washington University in St. Louis


Please don't contact me about the meteorite you think you’ve found until you read this and this.

e-mailkorotev@wustl.edu